Frager Factor

Monday, November 12, 2012

A Lot of New Worlds Need Good Names: Join The Planet Name Registry

"If the IAU ever considers even one of the trillion of worlds out there worthy of a name, Sagan should be high, if not first, on the list. And especially if (or when) astronomers eventually find that second 'Pale Blue Dot' elsewhere in the cosmos. If it's to people to get connected to space and exoplanet exploration than lets honor it with a good name, a good person and an amazing astronomer."





I've never understood how planets get there names nor such things as names for specific peaks and valleys on Mars. How does the whole world agree on that?

Anyhow Space.com is changing that crowdsourcing the process with a chance to name a planet after your baby to everyone who purchases their baby naming book.

First question is the exact match domain to their campaign name — PlanetRegistry.com is a Network Solutions holding/parked page owned by ElectricStudio.com who also uses a GoDaddy parked page. They seem to be a husband and wife team in the business of trademarks but not aware that they own traffic names that are earning money for the two companies they registered them worth. I wonder how much money Network So;lotions makes this way? I wonder if Google pays as low to them or pulls some of the crap they do with our parking  programs. But I digress...

According to the press release from Space.com 

"When new planets are discovered beyond the solar system, they often get boring designations such as HD 85512b or Gliese 667Cc. A startup hoping to liven up these names has launched a project to create a Baby Planet Name Book full of more colorful suggestions. The planet name project is the first official product from Uwingu, a new company that aims to raise money for space research, exploration and education. 
Now, for 99 cents apiece, you can nominate any name you like to join the new planet name registry, and you can also vote for your favorites among the current list. 
"The many, many planets discovered across the galaxy in past 20 years are a tribute to our natural human desire to explore beyond the horizon," planet-hunting astronomer Geoff Marcy of the University of California at Berkeley said in a statement. "Now people all over the world can participate in these discoveries in a new way, giving identities and even personality to billions of planets in our galaxy for the first time." 
To be clear, Uwingu officials say the names won't be official, and won't be attached to particular planets — yet. The only body authorized to officially name celestial objects is the International Astronomical Union (IAU), which hasn't so far expressed an interest in changing the status quo of planet naming. 
But Uwingu hopes astronomers might use the names from the project to refer to the new planets they keep finding, at least informally. The current tally of confirmed planets is almost 800 and growing, so that's a lot of worlds that need good names. 
"This is a whole new way for the people of Earth, of every age, of every nation, of every walk of life to creatively connect to space!" said Uwingu cofounder Alan Stern, a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute. "You can nominate planet names for your favorite town, state, or country, your favorite sports team, music artist, or hero, your favorite author or book, your school, your company, for your loved ones and friends, or even for yourself. And tell your friends about the names you nominate, so they can help vote them to the top! It's fun, it’s social, and it's for a great cause." [Planetary Science Takes a Hit in 2013 (Infographic)] 
Uwingu will use the money raised from the project to support research efforts like SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence)'s Allen Telescope Array in California, as well as space launches and science outreach. The company has also released a suite of planet-related educational materials for teachers to go along with the new project. 
"At Uwingu, we think that it’s important that kids learn, as well as play," said Uwingu education officer Emily CoBabe. "So we want to make Uwingu a place where teachers can stop by to get the best and most up-to-date space education materials."

Space.com's Facebook fans weren't so sure offering comments like:

I guess we don't have the imagination that the Greeks or Romans did "back in the day". I have an idea: why don't you name one for each person on Earth? That would give you a catalog of over 7 billion names, if you count only the people who are living; more if you count everyone who ever lived...

This is another big FAIL! Hmmm Dennis Hope & Robert Coles come to mind. Two degenerates selling 1 acre plots of land on the moon to stupid people that think they at actually buying something. Or what about the star registry where you can have a star named after you? Come on, is this what we have come too? I will gladly give these planets names for free!

Yeah lets waste thousands maybe millions of dollars in this broke economy to fund a program to come up with names, instead using the money in useful things like creating more jobs or giving money to the schools but no lets just waste it on stupid stuff

This is another big FAIL! Hmmm Dennis Hope & Robert Coles come to mind. Two degenerates selling 1 acre plots of land on the moon to stupid people that think they at actually buying something. Or what about the star registry where you can have a star named after you? Come on, is this what we have come too? I will gladly give these planets names for free!


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