Frager Factor

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

When Will We Ever Learn?




PhilipTaylor Commented 24 minutes ago in Politics“

"This world in (miIitary) ar'ms in not spending M0NEY alone."

"It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its CHlLDR'EN.

"The cost of one modern heavy B0M'BER is this: a modern brick school in more than 30 cities.

"It is two electric power plants, each serving a town of 60,000 population. 

"It is two fine, fully equipped hospitals.

"It is some 50 miles of concrete highway.

"We pay for a single FlGHTER with a half million bushels of wheat.

"We pay for a single DE'STR0YER with new homes that could have housed more than 8,000 people.

"This is not a way of life at all, in any true sense. Under the CL0UD (C0NDl RlCE ADDED MU'SHR00M) of thre'atening war, it is hum'anity ha'nging from a CR0SS of lR0N."

-- President Eisenhower (R) 1953”

In the opening days of the assault on Libya, the United States and the United Kingdom launched a barrage of at least 161 Tomahawk cruise missiles to flatten Moammar Gadhafi's air defenses and pave the way for coalition aircraft.

In fiscal terms, at a time when Congress is fighting over every dollar, the cruise missile show of military might was an expenditure of nearly a quarter of a billion dollars. Each missile cost $1.41 million, close to three times the cost listed on the Navy's website.

Raytheon Corp. is the manufacturer of the Tomahawk Block IV, a low-flying missile that travels at 550 miles per hour. During a decade of war in Afghanistan, Iraq, and now Libya, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on the Tomahawk. A year ago, Raytheon boasted of its 2,000th Block IV delivery to the Navy.

The 20-foot missile is particularly attractive for the military in current conflicts because it can be launched from submarines and surface ships at a safe distance and can be used to take out air-defense systems that could pose a threat to manned aircraft.

William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation and author of the book Prophets of War, said the use of the Tomahawk helps explain, in part, the high cost of the operations in Libya. "The no-fly zones in Iraq averaged about $1 billion or so per year, while the Libyan operation cost $100 million or more on the first day, largely due to the use of cruise missiles," Hartung said.

In the opening days of the assault on Libya, the United States and the United Kingdom launched a barrage of at least 161 Tomahawk cruise missiles to flatten Moammar Gadhafi's air defenses and pave the way for coalition aircraft.

In fiscal terms, at a time when Congress is fighting over every dollar, the cruise missile show of military might was an expenditure of nearly a quarter of a billion dollars. Each missile cost $1.41 million, close to three times the cost listed on the Navy's website.

Raytheon Corp. is the manufacturer of the Tomahawk Block IV, a low-flying missile that travels at 550 miles per hour. During a decade of war in Afghanistan, Iraq, and now Libya, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on the Tomahawk. A year ago, Raytheon boasted of its 2,000th Block IV delivery to the Navy.

The 20-foot missile is particularly attractive for the military in current conflicts because it can be launched from submarines and surface ships at a safe distance and can be used to take out air-defense systems that could pose a threat to manned aircraft.

William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation and author of the book Prophets of War, said the use of the Tomahawk helps explain, in part, the high cost of the operations in Libya. "The no-fly zones in Iraq averaged about $1 billion or so per year, while the Libyan operation cost $100 million or more on the first day, largely due to the use of cruise missiles," Hartung said.

It's a jobs program folks. Corporate welfare. You spend the missiles and we resupply them. Who cares if the country is broke and our kids will never be able too carry our national debt at its current rate?

The list of US B0MBlNG campaigns since 1950:

Korea and CHlNA 1950-53
Guatemala 1954
Indonesia 1958
Cuba 1959-1961
Guatemala 1960
Congo 1964
Laos 1964-73
Vietnam 1961-73
Cambodia 1969-70
Guatemala 1967-69
Grenada 1983
Lebanon 1983, 1984 (both Lebanese and SYRlAN targets)
Libya 1986
El Salvador 1980s
Nicaragua 1980s
lran 1987
Panama 1989
Iraq 1991 (Persian Gulf War)
Kuwait 1991
Somalia 1993
Bosnia 1994, 1995
Sudan 1998
Afghanistan 1998
Yugoslavia 1999
Yemen 2002
Iraq 1991-2003 (US/UK on regular basis)
Iraq 2003-present
Afghanistan 2001-present
Pakistan 2007-present
Somalia 2007-8, 2011
Yemen 2009, 2011
Libya 2011
SYRlA 2013?? 
lran 201?????

To be continued.... UNLESS THE PEOPLE UNITE TO END IT!
What say you?



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