Frager Factor

Monday, January 20, 2014

==> Karma Recycles Too

Good Evening Folks,

Lets take a trip back to a now declassified Frager Factor VIP post with predictions for 2009. Enough time has passed to ask "How Did We Do"?

My Twitter-ready prediction for 2009 in 142 characters or less:

Cloud computing will dominate. Users will to do more with less until companies begin looking for revenue streams from free services.
Marketing strategy needs no predicting because as Seth Godin states what every good marketer knows is that great marketing is timeless and proven:

  • Anticipated, personal and relevant advertising always does better than unsolicited junk.
  • Making promises and keeping them is a great way to build a brand.
  • Your best customers are worth far more than your average customers.
  • Share of wallet is easier, more profitable and ultimately more effective a measure than share of market.
  • Marketing begins before the product is created.
  • Advertising is just a symptom, a tactic. Marketing is about far more than that.
  • Low price is a great way to sell a commodity. That’s not marketing, though, that’s efficiency.
  • Conversations among the members of your marketplace happen whether you like it or not. Good marketing encourages the right sort of conversations.
  • Products that are remarkable get talked about.
  • Marketing is the way your people answer the phone, the typesetting on your bills and your returns policy.
  • You can’t fool all the people, not even most of the time. And people, once unfooled, talk about the experience.
  • If you are marketing from a fairly static annual budget, you’re viewing marketing as an expense. Good marketers realize that it is an investment.
  • People don’t buy what they need. They buy what they want.
  • You’re not in charge. And your prospects don’t care about you.
  • What people want is the extra, the emotional bonus they get when they buy something they love.
  • Business to business marketing is just marketing to consumers who happen to have a corporation to pay for what they buy.
  • Traditional ways of interrupting consumers (TV ads, trade show booths, junk mail) are losing their cost-effectiveness. At the same time, new ways of spreading ideas (blogs, permission-based RSS information, consumer fan clubs) are quickly proving how well they work.
  • People all over the world, and of every income level, respond to marketing that promises and delivers basic human wants.
  • Good marketers tell a story.
  • People are selfish, lazy, uninformed and impatient. Start with that and you’ll be pleasantly surprised by what you find.
  • Marketing that works is marketing that people choose to notice.
  • Effective stories match the worldview of the people you are telling the story to.
  • Choose your customers. Fire the ones that hurt your ability to deliver the right story to the others.
  • A product for everyone rarely reaches much of anyone.
  • Living and breathing an authentic story is the best way to survive in an conversation-rich world.
  • Marketers are responsible for the side effects their products cause.
  • Reminding the consumer of a story they know and trust is a powerful shortcut.
  • Good marketers measure.
  • Marketing is not an emergency. It’s a planned, thoughtful exercise that started a long time ago and doesn’t end until you’re done.
  • One disappointed customer is worth ten delighted ones.
  • In the Google world, the best in the world wins more often, and wins more.
  • Most marketers create good enough and then quit. Greatest beats good enough every time.
  • There are more rich people than ever before, and they demand to be treated differently.
  • Organizations that manage to deal directly with their end users have an asset for the future.
  • You can game the social media in the short run, but not for long.
  • You market when you hire and when you fire. You market when you call tech support and you market every time you send a memo.
  • Blogging makes you a better marketer because it teaches you humility in your writing.
  • Obviously, knowing what to do is very, very different than actually doing it.

If I had to pick one piece of marketing advice to give you, it would be to make something happen todaybefore you go home, before the holiday break.

Launch that idea, post that post, run that ad, call that customer.

Go the edge, that edge you've been holding back from... and do it today.

Without waiting for the committee or your boss or the market.

Just go.

And remember, our bodies can only be as strong as our minds...but the exact reverse is also true. The only true path is to strengthen both simultaneously.
Have a GREAT day,

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“Customers are hard to build and easy to loose”.

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Notable visits from:
NEWS CORPORATION; Apple; IBM; Microsoft; NASA; Salomon; Google; Cisco Systems; CBS; State Farm; Ogilvy; Alcatel; Johnson & Johnson, Inc.; Accenture; Glaxo Smith Kline; The McGraw-Hill Companies; Allied Waste Industries, Inc.; The Procter & Gamble Company; Unocal; Wyeth; Bayer Corporation; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Cushman & Wakefield; Cynosure, Inc.; Department of Veterans Affairs; Mac & Jacks Brewery; MACMILLAN; Poznanskie Zaklady Przemyslu Spirytusowego POLMOS (aka.; Carat MBS; GoDaddy; Alexander & Alexander Information Technology; KAUFF MCCLAIN MCGUIRE;  Bank of Montreal;   i2 Technologies, Inc.; The InfrastruX Group;  Key Bank; Medtronic, Inc.;  Lear; Bank One; ISO Media; Indian Institute of Foreign Trade

This communication has been declassified from Frager Factor VIP 12/21/08

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About The Author: Owen Frager is an Internet marketing expert ready to help take your company to the next level.

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