Frager Factor

Monday, March 05, 2012

The Best .CO Investment Is Staring You In The Mirror


We were in the holiday spirit one December on Rick's board and a member started a long thread by posing a question: "If Santa could bring you any domain for Christmas, what would it be? 90% answered "my own" complaining it just wasn't available to them."

Until .CO.

And that feeling of wanting to use your given name is exactly what companies, startups, have that makes .co so attractive. That's why brands like American Express and Intuit are backing the startup partnership on S.co (get it S-Corp for taxes)

First as a domineer it's time to look the part rather than be perceived as a cybersquatted schmuck who works in his underwear snagging domains will rubbing one off to porn. Today if you are in business, everyone is going to search you online. You need an identity. And 456tt34@hotmail.com versus John@Jones.co immediately tells people that you are a business, that, you are serious.

Forget whether it's a dot com or traffic leaks this is just a who's who in the world listing and people will find it. Your cards will say it. The return address will stand out on a business card, email, letterhead and in all the contact links in social media where we just don't know who we are dealing with and worse, if an address like that clears spam- those starting with info.456tt34 won't and others depend on the words used in the header.

Never use free or offer. I simply put their name in the subject line and write "I stumbled upon your websitre and discovered a problem you might never notice, that's easily solved and can make immediate improvements in your Google standing. Please let me know by reply a few convenient times for a live call. John Jones, Internet Improvement Expert at the Know-How Group. Then set up an about.me page branded with your .co, with a story about the "know-how group: for example as your name, use your .co there and link it from the bottom of all your sites or sales pages. It also gives you a way to establish a storefront like SilverInternetVentures.com that may help sell a company not just a domain. Then you can go to a bank, apply for a job, even show your neighbors what you do all day and then they can show it around to help you get known.

I know of many businesses that do not depend on search. They are consultants who open relationships get contacts established and email and business goes from there. rom LaughOfThe Day or LMAO.co versus 4568.Aol.com is going to get more attention in the queue. And if you are applying for a job it tells them right off you have advanced digital skill. It's impressive. The Director of Engineering at your startup isn't going to call you out for missing a dotCOM.

I couldn't get .com and have done just fine for 10 years with .us (I also have .co but since I was known as .com)

That's the promise of .co and that's why I am bullish on it.

Like me there will be plenty of .com owners who will want to protect their brands. Maybe that's why Rick bought 2500 .Cos. Remember he is a head of a multi-million enterprise that has no overhead and makes more than most 10 million businesses with 100s of employees. He has a tax problem. Re-invest the money or lose it to Uncle Sam.

I'd rather invest is ensuring ASS.co doesn't start bleeding my Ass.com. As for his Flowers.mobi investment, that was two days pay to him. Like you or I stepping up to a $50 bottle of wine. He had a prospect for it. There's public photos of them chatting about it. But they were blind sighted by iPhone even as an Apple user and insider I was warning .Mobi enthusiasts to stay back. Don't buy because of what Rick buys. And having the .co to sell in a package with the .com you own is smart business. Plus most large companies have two websites, one for customers and another for employees. .CO works great to brand the company one which employees navigate to by app log on and bookmarks. DO your homework! I told you this was not an investor play- it was designed for end users and matching .com owner didn't need to buy right away because they'd solidly win a UDRP at any time they chose, and they have proven it true.

Finally as an APP name, navigation matters less. 25 billion apps have been downloaded and there are 136,000 lucky developers who lose opportunity every day relying on Apple to be their home base. When I look at my stats, T.co really stands out. But when Purina makes an offer within the hungry dog app, it will probably be recorded as unknown. Having a matching domain, even if a .co will make the results stand out which furthers the branding.

With regard to .TV here are arguments I've been making for years. I think it's risky just from a legal standpoint (read the agreement you have no legal standing). You don't have stability in pricing and are paying a premium for something that hasn't established itself as such. A name brand drug can fetch $200 because it's been advertised and sold one on one to doctors who recommend it. But a "generic" is worth $3-10. TV has grossed $20 million and hasn't reinvested a penny in marketing it.

This extension is terrific if you have broadcast content. It's also how many companies brand their Google channels and it's great if you have a print site that can drive them to another site that's video sight and sound. Heels.com is an excellent example. B the web is TV and every .com can be a broadcast station (just wait until Apple's Wednesday announcement. TV hasn't been branded in the hearts and minds of people as the place to find TV. And you won't find TV there. It's on YouTube, Hulu and sites like AmericanIdol.com. Mostly it's clips shared by friends. The language set of the consumer has changed "Turn on the Plasma" "Lets watch it on the high definition channel" "Tivo it" "Let's see what's on cable" "Lets find a movie on Netflix". And Apple is about to fundamentally change our concept of web and TV.

Here are the top "TV" sites on the web, according to Nielsen's data:
1. YouTube -- 111.1 million average page views per month
2. Vevo -- 34.6 million average page views per month
3. Facebook -- 29.8 million average page views per month
4. Yahoo! -- 25.3 million average page views per month
5. MSN/WindowsLive/Bing -- 16.6 million average page views per month
6. AOL Media Network -- 13.3 million average page views per month
7. Hulu -- 13.1 million average page views per month
8. The CollegeHumor Network -- 12.5 million average page views per month
9. CNN Digital Network -- 8.3 million average page views per month
10. Netflix -- 7.4 million average page views per month

According to Forbes 250 million TVs are sold each year but few over $1000. They expect Apple to grab $6 million within days of the launch. Jeffries reasons:
  • The bill-of-materials for a well-equipped Apple television set — including a hard drive, enough processing power to support voice commands or gesture-based controls, and the usual complement of interactive television features — should come to about $896, allowing Apple to sell sets for about $1200.
  • The global television market is about 250 million units a year, but only about 10 million televisions costing more than $1000 are sold each year. Misek figures Apple will be able to entice a lot of people to pay more: so he figures Apple will have an initial addressable market of about 50 million units a year.
  • If Apple sells about 5 million of these sets in 2013 Apple could add $6 billion in revenues to the consensus estimate of $166 billion and between 69 cents and $1.03 to the consensus per-share earnings estimate of $38.34.
PS. These aren't idiots out to scam people at .CO they are people I know and trust and have excellent reputations which those complaining might try to improve for themselves by looking at the facts.
It's nice to just blame Rick for your failures. He's rich. Every purchased self-funded from profits on past ones. He has lawyers on retainer. He gets 100s of offers a day and has rejected thousands on many single names over time. Google and Yahoo treat him like a king because one knows the pain on bonus if they lose his account. You don't. You're not Rick. Grow up, grab a mitt and get into the game or go home to Mom and suck on your pacifier.


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About The Author: Owen Frager is an Internet marketing expert ready to help take your company to the next level.

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